EPA/NIEHS Children's Centers 2014 Webinar Series
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Wednesday, September 10, 2014 Webinar
1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. EDT

Join us for this month's webinar presenting research from various institutions. The webinar features presentations and interactive discussions including recent findings and new developments in children’s environmental health.

The mission of the EPA/NIEHS Centers program is to reduce children's health risks, protect children from environmental threats and promote their health and well-being in the communities where they live, learn and play.

The event is also cosponsored by the Office of Children’s Health Protection.

Please register for this Webinar and/or future Webinars by clicking on the button below:
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Please submit your questions in advance by clicking the button below:
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AGENDA
1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Home Sweet Home: Love It or List It!
Surveying the risk to children's health associated with indoor environmental exposures

Our home should be a sanctuary protecting us from physical and toxic exposures, but in some homes indoor environmental exposures pose a greater risk to children's health than outdoor exposures. In this webinar, Dr. Diette will present work examining methods for identifying pollutants and allergens in the home, their consequences and what can be done about them. Dr. Liu will present work examining the bacterial environment in our homes and bacteria's relation to asthma. Dr. Levin will discuss work using animal models to better understand the molecular mechanism that underlies the links between environmental tobacco smoke exposure and neurodevelopmental outcomes. Finally, Dr. Lowry will discuss the importance of assessing social determinants and the health of the environment as they relate to patient care. The webinar will provide examples of innovative approaches for understanding the determinants of indoor exposures on children's health, the mechanisms underlying some of these associations and methods for intervening and improving the health of children and families who are exposed.

   
Bernard Fuemmeler, Ph.D., M.P.H . (Moderator)
Duke University

Bernard Fuemmeler, Ph.D., M.P.H . (Moderator)
Duke University

   
Gregory Diette, M.D., M.H.S.
The Johns Hopkins University

Gregory Diette, M.D., M.H.S.
The Johns Hopkins University

The Role of the Home Indoor Environment in Asthma

Pollutants and allergens in the home can worsen asthma. We will discuss how to identify them and what can be done to help.

   
Andrew H. Liu, M.D.
National Jewish Health

Andrew H. Liu, M.D.
National Jewish Health

Everyday Exposures to Bacterial Endotoxins and Asthma in Children

We are surrounded by bacteria in our everyday lives. When are they harmful? Can they be helpful? What determines the difference? This portion of the Webinar will explore the nature of bacterial environments in children with asthma and what we have learned about these environments that might lessen the burden of asthma.

   
Ed Levin, Ph.D.
Duke University

Ed Levin, Ph.D.
Duke University

Predicting, Preventing and Treating Developmental Toxic Risks From Environmental Exposures Using Animal Models of Neurobehavioral Function

Neurobehavioral animal models can provide key information concerning the integration of health effects from environmental chemicals, from molecular mechanisms of action to behavioral dysfunction.

   
Jennifer Lowry, M.D.
Children's Mercy

Jennifer Lowry, M.D.
Children's Mercy

Returning to the House Call

The patient in your clinic is more than what you see. Social determinants and the health of the environment should be considered in all patients in our clinics.

   
2:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. Question and Answer Session and Discussion
   

BIOSKETCHES

Dr. Fuemmeler is Associate Professor, Community and Family Medicine, Psychology and Neuroscience, and Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. He is a licensed pediatric clinical psychologist who has additional expertise in developmental epidemiology. Broadly, his work focuses on the intersection between childhood neurodevelopment capacities (e.g., executive function, self-regulation, ADHD symptoms) and subsequent health and lifestyle behaviors. Related to this, Dr. Fuemmeler is interested in identifying prenatal exposures that compromise neurodevelopmental capacities central to executive functions and ADHD. He directs Project 1 of the Duke University Neurodevelopment and Improving Children's Health Following Environmental Tobacco Smoke Exposure (NICHES), Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Center, which focuses on prenatal and postnatal tobacco smoke exposure, neurodevelopment and potential epigenetic mediating factors.

   
 

Dr. Diette is an Associate Professor of Medicine, Epidemiology and Environmental Health Sciences. He is a pulmonologist with a practice devoted to the care of patients with obstructive lung diseases, including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). He has an extensive portfolio of patient-based research in asthma and COPD, supported by the National Institutes of Health and other sponsors. Dr. Diette's current research focuses on identifying factors that cause or provoke asthma, with special interest in air pollutants (particulate matter, NO2, secondhand smoke) and allergens (including mouse) that are especially problematic in inner-city homes. His research includes the effects of these pollutants and allergens on inflammation and oxidative stress. More recently, his research has been examining how dietary patterns, especially a Western-style diet, may increase susceptibility to inhalable pollutants and allergens.

   
  Dr. Liu is an Associate Professor of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology at National Jewish Health and the University of Colorado School of Medicine. His clinical and laboratory research program investigates the environmental determinants of airways inflammation and disease in children. His work targets asthma severity and exacerbations, with a long-standing interest in early intervention for disease modification and prevention. His research is supported by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). He leads a project in the Denver-based NIH NIEHS/EPA STAR program-sponsored Children's Environmental Health Center in Environmental Determinants of Respiratory Disease in Children, specifically investigating bacterial endotoxin exposure and asthma in children. Also, he is the Principal Investigator for the Denver site of the NIH National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases-sponsored Inner City Asthma Consortium. U.S. inner-city children experience a disproportionate burden of difficult, problematic asthma with poor control, severe exacerbations and associated risk for morbidity and mortality. Dr. Liu has a particular interest in interventions to improve asthma outcomes for these vulnerable children.
   
  Dr. Levin is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University Medical Center. He directs Project 2 of the Duke University NICHES Children's Environmental Health Center, Mechanisms of Neurobehavioral Dysfunction From Developmental Nicotine and Tobacco. He also directs the Neural and Behavioral Assessment and Training Cores of the Duke University Superfund Basic Research Program. Dr. Levin earned his Ph.D. in Environmental Toxicology in 1984 at the University of Wisconsin. He was an NIH-sponsored postdoctoral fellow in Psychopharmacology at UCLA and a visiting scientist at Uppsala University in Sweden. Since 1989, he has conducted research and taught at Duke University. Dr. Levin's research interests concern neurobehavioral pharmacology and toxicology, with a focus on the roles of nicotinic receptor systems in drug abuse, as well as cognitive function and developmental neurobehavioral toxicology in rats, mice and zebrafish. His research is directed not only at determining the functional nature and persistence of impairment, but also the mechanisms of dysfunction and the therapeutic treatments to counteract the damage.
   
  Dr. Lowry attended medical school at the University of South Dakota School of Medicine. She completed a Pediatric Residency and Clinical Pharmacology/Medical Toxicology Fellowship at the Children's Mercy Hospital in Kansas City, MO. She is board certified in Pediatrics and Medical Toxicology. She spent 5 years as the Medical Director of the Kansas Poison Control Center. She is the Section Chief of Medical Toxicology at Children's Mercy Hospital and an Associate Professor in Pediatrics at the University of Missouri, Kansas City. Dr. Lowry is the Director of the Mid-America Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit for EPA Region 7 and a medical toxicology liaison to the Region 7 Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. She is a current member of the Children's Health Protection Advisory Committee for the EPA and on the Executive Committee of the American Academy of Pediatrics' Council on Environmental Health.
 
We hope you will be able to join us.  The webinar will be recorded and posted on EPA's Children's Centers website at http://epa.gov/ncer/childrenscenters/multimedia/index.html.
 

Next Month

October 8, 2014 Webinar
1:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. EDT

Tracey J. Woodruff, Ph.D., M.P.H. (Moderator)
University of California, San Francisco

   

Peggy M. Shepard
WE ACT For Environmental Justice (WE ACT)

Advancing Environmental Justice through Research, Community Organizing and Advocacy

   

Cynthia Rand, Ph.D.
The Johns Hopkins University

Community-based Strategies to Reduce Children's Second Hand Smoke Exposure

   

Lisa Cicutto Ph.D., R.N.
National Jewish Health

Exciting Youth About Air Quality

   

Beti Thompson, Ph.D.
University of Washington

Community-based Participatory Research in an Agricultural Community

   

EPA Children's Centers Website

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NIEHS